Attribute Agreement Analysis Adalah

Second, the evaluation of the attribute agreement should be applied and the detailed results of the audit should provide a number of information that will help to understand how evaluation can be the best way to be organized. Once it is established that the bug tracking system is a system for measuring attributes, the next step is to examine the concepts of accuracy and accuracy that relate to the situation. First, it helps to understand that accuracy and precision are terms borrowed from the world of continuous (or variable) gags. For example, it is desirable that the speedometer in a car can carefully read the right speed over a range of speeds (z.B. 25 mph, 40 mph, 55 mph and 70 mph), regardless of the drive. The absence of distortion over a range of values over time can generally be described as accuracy (Bias can be considered wrong on average). The ability of different people to interpret and reconcile the same value of salary multiple times is called accuracy (and accuracy problems may be due to a payment problem, not necessarily to the people who use it). First, the analyst should determine that there is indeed attribute data. One can assume that the assignment of a code – that is, the division of a code into a category – is a decision that characterizes the error with an attribute. Either a category is correctly assigned to an error, or it is not. Similarly, the appropriate source location is either attributed to the defect or not. These are “yes” or “no” and “correct allocation” or “wrong allocation” answers. This part is pretty simple.

Attribute analysis can be an excellent tool for detecting the causes of inaccuracies in a bug tracking system, but it must be used with great care, reflection and minimal complexity, should it ever be used. The best way to do this is to first monitor the database and then use the results of that audit to perform a targeted and optimized analysis of repeatability and reproducibility. Like any measurement system, the accuracy and accuracy of the database must be understood before the information is used (or at least during use) to make decisions. At first glance, it appears that the apparent starting point begins with an analysis of the attribute (or attribute-Gage-R-R). That may not be a very good idea. The review should help determine which specific individuals and codes are the main causes of the problems, and the evaluation of the attribute agreement should help determine the relative contribution of repeatability and reproducibility issues to these specific codes (and individuals). In addition, many bug tracking systems have problems with precision readings that indicate where a defect has occurred, because the location where the defect is detected is recorded and not where the defect appeared. Where the error is found, it does not help much to identify the causes, which is why the accuracy of the site assignment should also be an element of the test. However, a bug tracking system is not an ongoing payment.

The assigned values are correct or not; There is no (or should not) grey area. If codes, locations and degrees of gravity are defined effectively, there is only one attribute for each of these categories for a particular error. Unlike a continuous measurement value, which cannot be accurate (on average), any lack of precision in an attribute measurement system inevitably leads to accuracy problems. If the error coder is not clear or undecided on how to encode a defect, different codes are assigned to several defects of the same type, making the database imprecise. In fact, the vagueness of an attribute measurement system is an important factor in inaccuracies.

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